From exhibitions

Tick-Tock: Time in Contemporary Art

Check out my painting in the slick catalogue for the exhibition Tick-Tock: Time in Contemporary Art at the Lehman College Art Gallery. The exhibition ran from February 2 – May 5, 2018.

My painting, Three, was included in the exhibition with numerous other works of depicting the concept of time.

“Stott created this quietly beautiful still life of three alarm clocks, all pointing to three o’clock, using a restrained palette of silver, taupe, and aqua that is subtly complimentary, like musical variations on a single theme. The artist revels in the visual satisfaction derived from the delineating variations in groups of similar objects. Here, the shapes of the bells, font of the numbering, and the style of the hands all lead the eye through and around the painting, encouraging the viewer to contemplate the similarities and find the differences in a kind of visual game.”

Tick-Tock: Front Cover
Tick-Tock: Back Cover

George Billis Gallery, Los Angeles, April 2018

I traveled to Los Angeles to attend the opening reception for my exhibition on April 7. As a studio painter, I spend all of my time in one place working on my paintings. That’s the way I like it, but I have to admit that it’s really good to get out once in a while. It’s a benefit that the galleries where I show my work are in interesting places.

Having people see the paintings in person is really important. We’re all glancing at them illuminated on a tiny screen, so it’s refreshing to see people inspect them up close in person and really experience them. But the absolute best part is meeting people who make the time to come and see them.

October 5 – Opening Reception

I traveled to New York to attend the opening reception at the George Billis Gallery for my current exhibition. My son came along for a few days of site seeing. He turned 15 on the day of the reception and I’m glad to say both he and I had a great time.

Sharing Paintings on Social Media

Receptions, for me, can be a bit of a nerve rattling experience. As a studio painter I spend all of my time in solitude and concentration. Focussing on square inch by square inch on each painting. This is, of course, exactly how I want it. It’s why I’m able to make as much work as I do. I like working toward the deadline of a gallery exhibition. It gives me something to aim towards.

So after spending so much time alone with each painting, it can be an exhilarating experience to see them hanging and lit in a large gallery space. I am especially proud of the way this exhibition turned out. But it can feel a bit exposing for there to suddenly be dozens of people looking so closely. These paintings invite this close scrutiny.

The best part about the receptions is connecting with people who make it a point to come see the paintings in person. I always say that I wish everyone could see them in their natural habitat instead of on a phone, tablet or computer screen.

Oliver No. 3 Typewriter

Oliver No.3 Typewriter Painting by Christopher Stott

This painting of an Oliver No.3 Typewriter from 1907 is my contribution to the Attention to Detail exhibition at the Robert Lange Studios in Charleston, South Carolina. The Exhibition runs through February 2017.

Robert Lange Studios / February 2017

The exhibition features 30 realist painters from the USA, Canada, Spain and England. It is an honour to have been invited to show my work beside artists who share an affinity for this labour intensive approach to painting.

I found this magnificent typewriter at Everything Old – an antique shop near my home.

George Billis Gallery LA, May 21 – July 2, 2016

I had a great time in Los Angeles at the opening reception for my exhibition at the George Billis Gallery LA.

Christopher Stott / New Paintings / George Billis Gallery LA / 2016
Christopher Stott / New Paintings / George Billis Gallery LA / 2016
Christopher Stott / New Paintings / George Billis Gallery LA / 2016
Christopher Stott / New Paintings / George Billis Gallery LA / 2016

For the most part, being a painter is a solitary experience. One spends a great deal of time focussing and concentrating on making the paintings, then things turn completely and you find yourself sharing the finished pieces with everyone you possibly can. It can be a little jarring to go from solitude and privacy to a public, open space.

But I’m very happy with the way the paintings turned out. And I think the gallery did a great job of displaying the paintings.

John A. Peralta / Fiat Lux I
John A. Peralta / Fiat Lux I

The gallery is also showing a few sculptural pieces by John A. Peralta. These exploded camera and projector pieces are fascinating. I see it as a deconstruction / reconstruction way of looking at things. Viewing these exploded objects has the same effect as my paintings – they make the viewer slow down and really investigate the object.

John’s construction of these sculptures is absolutely meticulous. True craftsmanship.